Mormon Channel Blog

Lessons on Virtue

December 26, 2015

To me, virtue is the pursuit of worthy, honest thoughts and activities as well as the avoidance of evil. More specifically, living virtuously is not just saying “no” to some things, but it is saying “yes” to much, much more. As I aim to live an abundant life full of virtuous things—seeking all that is lovely, of good report, and praiseworthy—I have found there is no time, brainpower, energy, or desire for anything else. The figurative chaff flies away, and I am left with a rich, fulfilling existence.

As a principle of power, I view virtue as a necessary characteristic to accomplishing my purpose, plan, and mission in life. Just as when Moses was shown the wonders of God’s creations and realized that man was nothing without God, I know that when we are living with virtue we can have the companionship of the Holy Spirit and other means of divine intervention from Heavenly Father to guide our lives. Without that, we would be nothing.

While this Christlike attribute is important, cultivating it might not seem appealing. Depending on my life circumstances, living the gospel every day hasn’t always come easily or felt intuitive. But I have to remind myself that the effort required to be on a virtuous track is always 100% worth it.

Here are a few examples in my life where I have chosen to incorporate virtue:

  • I am at a happy hour with coworkers and ask for a soda. I may get some funny looks from people, but it’s a way for me to live my standards in the world.
  • I answer a friend’s question about the law of chastity and pray for the guidance of the Spirit to do so properly.
  • I point out that my lunch bill didn’t include my side of fries so that I can honestly pay the full amount.

There are many ways that we can live virtuously simply by living our testimony. Whatever the case may be, I can say that living with virtue cultivates light in my life. It also makes me a more useful tool in the Lord’s hands and emboldens me to stand as a witness of God at all times, in all things, and in all places.

At the end of the day, I believe that a life spent cultivating good habits helps us become virtuous. I feel a much greater level of self-confidence and inner peace when I do this, and, what is more, I am in a better position to share the gospel and set a good example for friends. I feel more comfortable approaching God through prayer, and my thoughts become His thoughts and my ways His ways. I look outward and don’t fixate so much on myself. The world needs more women of virtue. I testify that focusing on attaining the characteristic of virtue will lead us to more meaningful lives.